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RENT YOUR WHITE C C ROBES

at

Carl Coerce’s

“The Student’s Buddy”

Ties and Hankies to match at small additional cost.

(We have the only store on campus)


BUY YOUR FAVORITE SCOTRASH REEL RECORDS

at

Galloway’s Record Shoppee

Reasonable Prices

Two Entrances (one for us, one for them)

Located on South Magnolia

 

–The Nigble Papers, Vol. 2, No. 1, Friday 17, February 1866 [sic], p. [8]. 
[Staff: Editor, Jean Morrison; Asst. Editor, Sylvia Topp; Feature Editors, Bob Allyn, Martin Moore, all then students at the University of Mississippi]

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:

You there,

I don’t mean to have my name used in your trashy paper.

Anon

Sir,

I don’t like you, but I like your methods. Keep up the rabble-rousing.

Uncle Joe

Gentlemen,

When I first beheld a copy of your lovely, jewel-studded paper, I thought joyously to myself: We can’t have enough of this sort of thing. I erred.

Tiny Tim Timothy

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:

Please Sir,

I’m Scotch Irish and I begin to fear you bode me ill. I don’t know quite what to do about it. Who can I appeal to, if that is what you bode me. I’m afraid I schall [sic] have to take matters into my own hand. If it happens that you do indeed plan my bad fortune, I shall respond by marrying your women. Besides that I’ll kill you all. Watch Out!

Name withheld by request.

Hello,

When God made us, he sure did make a mess, didn’t he. I don’t know what we did to deserve all this mickey mouse. After all, we do our best, and it never seems quite good enough for this old God. Reading your paper gives me faith in man. I’m not going to pray another bit, until God destroys the Scotch Irish by a miracle. Make a sign.

Simon Pure

GENTLEMEN,

I live in the North and I hate Scotch-Irish, but I don’t want to move into the crummy South. Your cause and splendid paper stirs me to action, but I’m afraid. There is some chance that if I kill any Scotch-Irishers up here I may be bought [sic] to trial and convicted. I’m in a tizzy, and I just don’t know what to do. Please advise me.

Harry Trublu

–The Nigble Papers, Vol. 2, No. 1, Friday 17, February 1866 [sic], p. [8]. 
[Staff: Editor, Jean Morrison; Asst. Editor, Sylvia Topp; Feature Editors, Bob Allyn, Martin Moore, all then students at the University of Mississippi]

A STATEMENT ON OUR EDITORIAL POLICY:

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A STATEMENT ON OUR EDITORIAL POLICY:

Any obscenity which you may find in this paper is so that those who disagree with our editorial policy can still enjoy the publication. GOOD LUCK!

LET’S BE ALL, ALL AMERICAN

–The Nigble Papers, Vol. 2, No. 1, Friday 17, February 1866 [sic], p. [8]. 
[Staff: Editor, Jean Morrison; Asst. Editor, Sylvia Topp; Feature Editors, Bob Allyn, Martin Moore, all then students at the University of Mississippi]

POEM

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POEM

Today I looked at meadows.

I thought: pretty meadows.

Today I saw houses.

I thought: good houses.

Today I looked on sky.

I thought: big sky.

It all made real sense.

Relations wise.

Then I glanced at Scotrash.

I thought: Why?

Why must all my happy

Happy thoughts be blurred

By this, an ugly image.

They do not fit.

They do not mean.

They are not us.

Darn damn them.

Life is tough enough

Without their going on to live.

–The Nigble Papers, Vol. 2, No. 1, Friday 17, February 1866 [sic], p. [8]. 
[Staff: Editor, Jean Morrison; Asst. Editor, Sylvia Topp; Feature Editors, Bob Allyn, Martin Moore, all then students at the University of Mississippi]

WANT ADS:

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WANT ADS:

We need members. You can join now. Rush, rush. There are several openings in our ranks. References, if you please. Citizen’s Council, Box 555.

All-white family trees manufactured while you wait. No questions asked, not even your name. Phone 204. Day or night.

Wanted: ex-FBI man for screening job and general spying. Krugg McLeg, Phone 1505.

Fragments of the solid South. Five acres for one cent. Save it; it’s [sic] value will rise. Also several colonial white elephant mansions available now. We have all these mansions and no aristocracy. Contact by appointment Cecil Stubb, Louisiana Earth Displacers, Box 326.

Lovable, cozy one-room Southern cottage with southern exposure and two acres of adjoining red clay available for scotrish tenant farmer and family. With fireplace and cold running water 50 ft. from the outhouse. Well ventilated, scenic location on historic Tallahatchie river.

–The Nigble Papers, Vol. 2, No. 1, Friday 17, February 1866 [sic], p. [8]. 
[Staff: Editor, Jean Morrison; Asst. Editor, Sylvia Topp; Feature Editors, Bob Allyn, Martin Moore, all then students at the University of Mississippi]

LIMERICK OF THE WEEK

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LIMERICK OF THE WEEK

The mind must be narrow,

The skin must be white;

                                              

                                              

Write the ending to this lovely limerick and try to make it rhyme. Then tear the top off the nearest used scotrish and send in with 25 cents in coin for a place in our big South-wide contest. You may win as much as fifty cents, a lifetime supply of Jim Eastland, a lifetime’s subscription to Nigble Papers, and a mouth full of hominy. Box 522.

–The Nigble Papers, Vol. 2, No. 1, Friday 17, February 1866 [sic], p. [8]. 
[Staff: Editor, Jean Morrison; Asst. Editor, Sylvia Topp; Feature Editors, Bob Allyn, Martin Moore, all then students at the University of Mississippi]

AN OLE MISS COED THINKS About Intermarriage

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AN OLE MISS COED THINKS About Intermarriage

Some people think the girl who goes to college these days is a pretty wild sort of person–especially if she goes to Old Mess or some other school where they have a few parties and dances and go to Memphis one or two weekends and sometimes to New Orleans once or twice during the entire year, and to Nashville or Atlanta if the football team plays there–when all she is doing is showing a little school spirit. But some people honestly believe that all a college girl does is chase boys and run around all the time. They do not realize that girls of today–especially college graduates–are accepting a lot more responsible positions in industry; they are helping to manage their family finances; they are working as secretaries, which means doing a lot more than just taking letters; they are teaching school; and many girls are doing all these things while raising their children and caring for their husbands and frequently even helping him by being a secretary in his office, for instance, at the same time.

And another thing a lot of people think is that all girls go to college for is to get married. This just isn’t true and it makes me so mad when I hear someone say it I just see red. Girls go to college to get an education and if all they were going to do were to get married their parents wouldn’t send them to college anyway.

If they knew, I mean. Of course all girls want to have the opportunity to meet the most outstanding boys, and those who will not have any trouble getting a good job such as coaching or being an officer in the army or becoming a retail salesman. But when a girl comes to college, she wants to meet boys who understand what the important things in life are, and boys who know that happiness and security are the really worthwhile things to provide for their family.

Of course there is a lot more to getting an education than just going to classes and studying textbooks and spending sometimes as many as two evenings a week in the library. An Ole Mess student is encouraged to develop socially, religiously, and mentally, for a well-rounded education is necessary to meet the various demands of modern daily existence. Too much emphasis on one kind of development can lead to a one-sided personality. Take mentally, for instance. Every student should be very careful of the number of courses she takes and of the number of hours she spends studying. Too much studying can lead to overdevelopment mentally and leave a good student open to such misfortunes as skepticism and intellectualism.

Development of social grace is important if a student is to learn to accept the responsibilities of today’s society. Making social decisions such as what to wear on dates, how to act, and whom to go where with are decisions that many girls are making more for themselves than ever. Fortunately, there are dormitory hostesses and the WSLTD (Women Students Limited) to fallback [sic] on, and to show us the way to turn with a firm hand, so that really we are worried no more by things like decisions than we were before coming to college.

And this is sort of why I do not understand why everyone is so all stirred up about intermarriage. I just don’t understand it. There has been no intermarriage before, and why should it happen now? I think the more intermarriage is kept quiet, the better. Attitudes do not change. The way people talk you would think every girl in the state is desperate for intermarriage, or either she has no thoughts on marriage at all and must be taught some before she thinks herself. These ideas are all wrong, and the danger is overestimated. And nowadays there is a lot of confusion about the biological side of the question. I have talked with the other girls on third floor Ward, and they know a lot about biology and things like that, but we can’t understand what everyone is so worried about. After all, things are the way they are and we have to bear them, so why make biology a topic for argument? Bit [but?] I mean there is more to marriage than biology. People still have morals. After all, I think the moral standards of the people will prevent serious integration and intermarriage which would really harm our culture from taking place.

–The Nigble Papers, Vol. 2, No. 1, Friday 17, February 1866 [sic], p. [7]. 
[Staff: Editor, Jean Morrison; Asst. Editor, Sylvia Topp; Feature Editors, Bob Allyn, Martin Moore, all then students at the University of Mississippi]

The Lord hath made all the peoples of the earth and hath put them in their assigned places. — Genesis 28:31

MORE RECOMMENDED READING

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MORE RECOMMENDED READING

“Sir Galahad’s Search for The Dixie Cup” by Hezekiah Snipes

A modern, up-to-date retelling of the ancient stirring tale of King Arthur & His Knights of the Round Table. How Sir Galahad, of a fine, aristocratic, old Southern family, finally succeeded in his search for the Dixie Cup.

–The Nigble Papers, Vol. 2, No. 1, Friday 17, February 1866 [sic], p. [7]. 
[Staff: Editor, Jean Morrison; Asst. Editor, Sylvia Topp; Feature Editors, Bob Allyn, Martin Moore, all then students at the University of Mississippi]

RECOMMENDED READING–by Ripples Arkansan

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RECOMMENDED READING–by Ripples Arkansan

“Mixed Company and Mixed Drinks”

by Hyper Ravinall Slash

Although this well conglomerated article in the November issue of “Pacific” is a good, intemperate discussion of all principal issues on school integration and intermarriage, we must take issue with him on one or two points. But first let us consider the excellent arguements [sic] which Mr. Slash has set down for all Southerners to study and use profitably in leading their children along the straight and narrow path.

He begins by summing up the unquestionable succession of wise and prudent Southern decissions [sic] in our long history of dealing with the other race among us. He enumerates the open-minded, forward-looking policies and attitudes which have kept us free from miscegenation. These decissions [sic] and policies, according to Slash, are what have kept our South pure by developing in our Youth the Natural and instinctive preferences for their own race. It has also instructed them in the sincere and longstanding customs by which we show our intense love and deep kindness toward the non-Caucasians. May we suggest that perhaps Mr. Slash, in his sincere attempt to make the North and other countries understand the true virtue of our position has let himself wax passionate in this explanation of our feeling. Perchance he has given the impression that the feeling between the races of the South is of equal to equal. We hesitate to suggest that this idea occur to a man as sincere as Rev. Slash, but we wish to assert that the education of the Southern Youth should be safeguarded in every way and at all costs.

This brings us to another rather controversial point: there have been some who boldly assure that integration in the schools need not lead to intermarriage. Answers Mr. Slash: “Unless the Natural instincts of race preference are allowed to develop in the education of Southern children, their continued natural moral feeling against intermarriage cannot be expected.” He assures us that our young people grow up in the happy security of

(cont’d on next page)

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RECOMMENDED READING (Cont’d)

knowing that they are learning preferences that are Right and Natural, and that revolt is useless.

The imbuing of children with Natural race preference is a practice rarely upheld now except in the South, continues Ravingall Slash. We see Chinese, Jews, Arabs, Portuguese, Brazilians, and Northerners allowing the purity of their races to be despoiled. It is up to the South to lag behind these others and so insure [sic] the parity of the White race, and thus its survival, for geneticists and biologists, except those too squeamish to be racists, assure us that intermarriage would undoubtedly have effects on our race, producing unimaginable monsters. The use of Natural Racial preference and continued separation can save us from the amalgamation of racial identity (now being questioned by Pseudoscientific Buncombe) and help us to shield the non Caucasians from being contaminated by mixed company and mixed drinks.

–The Nigble Papers, Vol. 2, No. 1, Friday 17, February 1866 [sic], p. [6-7]. 
[Staff: Editor, Jean Morrison; Asst. Editor, Sylvia Topp; Feature Editors, Bob Allyn, Martin Moore, all then students at the University of Mississippi]

THE SCREENING BOARD STORY:

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THE SCREENING BOARD STORY:

What is the story on the campus screening board? Do we as freedom loving citizens of the most democratic of states have anything to worry about? I mean is there any chance that wrong-thought provoking (or thought provoking) speakers could arrive on this campus; is there any danger that more than our side of any question might be presented for consideration? Can we be subverted, speaker wise?

Is there any truth at all to the rumor that a foreigner is coming all the way from the East to stir up resentment and discontent among our sunny dispositions, respectively?

About the last question: there have been foreigners here in the past; we admit it carefully. Nothing has changed much. That is the real test. To be sure, some unsavory thought has been present on the campus – what would be the point in attempting to forget or deny it? Our people have weathered it rather splendidly, don’t you think? We go on being for the most part what we were, yet I grant the obvious danger of continued exposure to unmanageable extraneous thought. But is there any danger, really, here at this particular place at this particular time?

You know as well as I do that the answer to that is a resounding NO. What steps do we take to insure [sic] our spiritual isolation? First, we pack our ever-lovin’ screening board with people who understand our determination to remain at all costs sterile. As if that weren’t enough, we hold up all applications for speakers who could conceivably deviate from the party line of the most lied about state in the union. We hold up the applications at least until we are sure that the speaker in question could not possibly accept the invitation, wanted he to.

What standard do we level along side of our speakers? With pride I mention the list of undesirables patiently drawn up by the very attorney-general of the United States. Often times that list, however well-meaning, is not long enough.


Any obscenity in this paper is so that those who disagree with our editorial po-[illegible]

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THE SCREENING BOARD STORY:

In such cases, there is the impregnable standard of (and we’re proud of the choice of words) “good taste.” Let me assure you immediately that there is no person no place who can measure up to this standard unless we as a body choose to allow it. You would actually be surprised.

That’s the story of the screening board itself, but actually you are personally even safer than that would indicate. Because you live in this last stronghold of democracy, the people’s screening board is more sure and swift. In the event an unfortunate speaker should slip through our defenses, or that an otherwise fortunate choice should let slip an unfortunate remark we may live in the certainty that the Mob shall bring him down and tear him to shreds.

In the final analysis, it is the Mob that decides what’s what in this state. Let’s not forget.

–The Nigble Papers, Vol. 2, No. 1, Friday 17, February 1866 [sic], p. [6]. 
[Staff: Editor, Jean Morrison; Asst. Editor, Sylvia Topp; Feature Editors, Bob Allyn, Martin Moore, all then students at the University of Mississippi]